GSS Habit #2 – Use Kefir Skincare

The essential power of the Good Skin Solution is to heal from the inside and outside at the same time. So while you are drinking the kefir to restore the good bugs inside your gut microbiome, you need to also apply the kefir to your skin, in order to heal your skin biome.

The simplest way to do this is to use kefir skincare, in the form of kefir cleansers and kefir lotions. Chuckling Goat can ship kefir skincare to your door, or you can make your own. It is also possible to apply kefir directly to your skin, or pour it into your bath for a biome-restorative soak.

It is also important to eliminate biome-destroying chemicals from your personal care routine. Many of the environmental toxins that damage the microbiome can be found in either personal care products or household cleaners. You will need to get rid of any products that contain parabens, phthalates, petrochemicals, artificial dyes or perfumes.

The average woman “hosts” an average of 515 unique chemicals by the time she finishes her bathroom routine in the morning. These chemicals can leach into your system and alter your DNA. Your cells then fail to recognise one another, and fire on each other. This “friendly-fire” is the definition of autoimmune; it literally causes your system to attack itself, resulting in autoimmune skin conditions including eczema, psoriasis, rosacea and acne.

So this is the perfect time to do a clean sweep of your bathroom cabinets. Get rid of anything that contains nasty chemicals that you can’t pronounce! Replace these products with clean, safe products that are chemical free and will not harm your skin biome. Janey Lee Grace in her book Look Great Naturally…Without Ditching the Lipstick has many recommendations for replacing toxic beauty products with healthy natural alternatives.

8 thoughts on “GSS Habit #2 – Use Kefir Skincare

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  1. Hi Shann,
    My son is using your “sensitive soap and lotion” on his eczema which he says “calms his itch down and makes it more tolerable”. But sometimes he uses pure aloe vera gel in addition to your lotion. Does that undo the work of the kefir soap and lotion?

    I have him taking Borage oil, flaxseed oil and omega 3 oil capsules and a probiotic along with a powder ,”skin friend am”. I have been using store bought kefir, it is plain, but is not fizzy or tart to taste, which makes me think its not working like it could. I am also trying to get on the path of having bone broth made more often, but so far its only being made once or twice a month. I also just started him drinking Oolong tea.

    Do you think I’m trying to many things at once on him?

    Thank you for reading this post and your time.
    Respectfully, Brenda

    1. Hi Brenda – That all sounds good, and aloe vera gel is fine, as long as he’s just applying it to the skin and not drinking it – I don’t recommend taking it internally! You’re in the US, aren’t you? I reccomend Redwood Hill Farm goatsmilk kefir in the US – http://www.redwoodhill.com/goat-kefir/where-to-buy/. I don’t think you’re trying too many things – stick with it, you should see a good result! You might also try adding 2 TBSP daily of Bulletproof collagen powder and 1 TBSP daily of Bulletproof Brain Octane Oil to his diet – this will help to heal the gut. These are on my Shann Recommends page, here: https://www.chucklinggoat.co.uk/shann-recommends/
      Best, Shann

      1. Hi Shann, the aloe vera gel is applied to his skin, only his problem areas. Yes we live in the US, and I bought the kefir brand suggested above, in Plain, but this brand is still not tangy or sour tasting either? Will stick with it and see how it goes! I changed from Borage oil capsules to Evening Primrose oil capsules, as I found that the natural PA toxins in Borage oil might be toxic to our liver, Black currant and Evening Primrose oil don’t have these natural toxins and are still a good source of GLA. Since I still have not been consistent with making the bone broth, I will find the collagen powder and brain octane oil and try those in place of broth, with all the other things listed above, and see after a few months if it helps his eczema.

        Just sending a great big Thank You, for taking your time in reading my post and then giving me ideas of products to try!
        Thank you, Brenda

  2. Hi Shann, I listened to your lesson on Hay House. I found the lesson very enlightening since I suffer with gut issues although it is not IBS. A few years ago I was intolerant to milk, whipped cream and cannot eat ice-cream or any diary. You mentioned that Goats Kefir helps with eczema, acne, psoriasis and rosacea; does it help with Melasma?

    1. Hi Nishana – Melasma is associated with autoimmune disorders, and so sits in the gut. You’ll need to heal the gut, in order to heal the skin. I suggest at least 6 months of the drinking kefir back to back, plus the BreakOut Kefir Cleanser and Lotion. If you have more questions, feel free to ring 01239 654 072 and a member of the team will be happy to help. Best, Shann

  3. Hi Shann,

    I have not purchased the Redwoodhill goat milk kefir as yet, however, I viewed the website and noticed that their ingredients lists does not have real kefir grains. Does this impact results for a healthy gut?

    Thanks
    Nishana

    1. Hi Nishana – Yes, it does. Kefir made with powdered sachets are not as powerful as kefir made with real kefir grains. Redwood Hill Farm is the only US supplier I have found that does an unflavoured goats milk kefir, so it’s the best of the lot that I’m aware of – but you’re right, it would be better if they used real grains! If you find a US supplier who does, please do let me know. Best, Shann